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Digital

  • The Unique Challenges of Cross-Boundary Collaboration

    Technology has made business more globally connected than ever before. This is especially true for innovation projects, where diverse experts bring their specialized knowledge to play. But there’s a hitch: Many of today’s team projects have built-in hurdles because of differing communication styles, cultures, and professional norms. Leading this kind of “extreme teaming,” which often involves complicated hierarchies of power, demands both curiosity and humility.

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  • Is Your Company Ready for a Digital Future?

    There are four different pathways that businesses can take to become top performers in the digital economy. Leadership’s role is to determine which pathway the company should pursue – and how aggressively to move.

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  • Surviving a Day Without Smartphones

    For young adults accustomed to continually checking their cellphones, even a single day without access to them can be anxiety-producing. What are the implications for executives about managing this constantly connected generation – and their devices -- in the workplace?

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  • Handbook of Collective Intelligence

    Intelligence does not arise only in individuals; it also arises in groups of individuals. This is collective intelligence: groups of individuals acting collectively in intelligent ways. In recent years, a new kind of collective intelligence has emerged: interconnected groups of people and computers.

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  • The Inversion Factor: How to Thrive in the IoT Economy

    In the past, companies found success with a product-first orientation; they made a thing that did a thing. The Inversion Factor explains why the companies of today and tomorrow will have to abandon the product-first orientation. Rather than asking “How do the products we make meet customer needs?” companies should ask “How can technology help us reimagine and fill a need?” Zipcar, for example, instead of developing another vehicle for moving people from point A to point B, reimagined how people interacted with vehicles. Zipcar inverted the traditional car company mission.

    The authors explain how the introduction of “smart” objects connected by the Internet of Things signals fundamental changes for business. The IoT, where real and digital coexist, is powering new ways to meet human needs. Companies that know this include giants like Amazon, Airbnb, Uber, Google, Tesla, and Apple, as well as less famous companies like Tile, Visenti, and Augury. The Inversion Factor offers a roadmap for businesses that want to follow in their footsteps.

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  • Surviving in an Increasingly Digital Ecosystem

    Companies today will have to reinvent themselves to survive, and every large and ambitious company should be trying to figure out how to become a destination for its customers. Consumers are voting with their mobile devices and choosing from a handful of dominant “ecosystem drivers”— businesses such as Amazon and WeChat, which become destinations for their customers’ needs by offering complementary or sometimes competing services — for each domain in their lives.

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  • The Board’s Role in Managing Cybersecurity Risks

    Cybersecurity can no longer be the concern of just the IT department. Within organizations, it needs to be everyone’s business — including the board’s.

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  • CIOs and the Future of IT

    Chief information officers need to oversee all of IT – in close collaboration with marketers and the business units. Only then can companies deliver digital experiences that win, serve, and retain increasingly demanding customers.

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  • Could the Big Technology Companies of Today Be the Financial Advisers of Tomorrow?

    Following the example of Alibaba in China, Amazon is leveraging strong trust in its brand and its broad customer base to enter the U.S. financial market. While Alibaba saw opportunity in the lack of credit cards in China, Amazon could use credit cards’ ubiquity in the U.S. to reach a large pool of potential customers.

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  • Improving Your Digital Intelligence

    A study of 250 global companies found that a company’s digital intelligence is informed by four dimensions: strategy, culture, organization, and capabilities. Within these dimensions, the research identified 18 management practices that contribute the most to digital leaders’ financial and market success — and offer a roadmap for companies seeking to expand their digital know-how.

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